Smith And Wesson Model 48 Serial Numbers

SERIAL NUMBER K27473. S&W MODEL K-22 MASTERPIECE (CIRCA 1948), VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT GRIPS SERIAL NU.Click for more info. Seller: Guardian Arms. $875.00 'Smith & Wesson K22.22 LR (PR44064) GI#: 101527108. SMITH & WESSON MODEL K-22 K22 PINNED BARREL 6” REVOLVER CIRCA 1959. Please enter the serial number below. Please enter the serial number below.

Smith & Wesson Model 48 (K-22 MRF Masterpiece) .22 Mag. Revolver

By the Guns and Shooting Online Staff


S&W Model 48-4. Illustration courtesy of gunsamerica.com.

  1. Essentially the same in appearance as.32 Model but chambered for.38 S&W cartridge. Also offered with 3.25', 4', 5', 6', 8' and 10' barrel. There were numerous internal changes in this model, similar to.32 Double-Action 3rd Model. Serial Range 119001 to 3227000.
  2. Model 14,15,16,17,18,48,53 (all start without dash in 1957). Serial# is N82XXX. I called Smith when I first bought it used. Open the cylinder and the model.

The Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece .22 LR revolver was Smith & Wesson's finest double action (DA) rimfire revolver and, along with the Colt Diamondback .22, probably the best rimfire target revolver available anywhere. A version of the K-22 Masterpiece revolver is still offered today, as the Model 17 Classic.

This article is about the Model 48 K-22 Masterpiece, which was simply a Model 17 chambered for the .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (.22 Mag.) cartridge. Most gun manufacturers do not change model numbers when the same gun is chambered for a different cartridge, but S&W does, creating some confusion about their line. Incidentally, S&W called the .22 WMR the '22 M.R.F.' (Magnum Rim Fire) and stamped the barrels of their Model 48 revolvers accordingly.

Winchester's original .22 WMR ballistics called for a 40 grain JHP or FMJ bullet at a muzzle velocity of 1550 fps and muzzle energy of 213 ft. lb. from a 6.5 inch barrel. This made the .22 Mag's JHP bullet a devastating small game, varmint and small predator handgun cartridge out to around 100 yards, with a flat trajectory to match. Compared to the .22 LR, it had the punch to anchor larger and tougher animals, such as jack rabbits, marmots, foxes and coyotes, much more reliably and at longer range.

When Winchester/Olin introduced the hot .22 Mag. cartridge to the public in 1959, they apparently did not consult with S&W. However, for years the Springfield, Mass. USA firm had been building and selling their fine Model 17 K-22 Masterpiece target revolver, chambered for the .22 LR cartridge.

Like the K-32 and K-38 centerfire target revolvers, the K-22 Masterpiece was built on S&W's .38 caliber size K-frame, so strength was not an issue. It was only necessary to lengthen the Model 17's cylinder chambers to accept the longer (and slightly fatter) .22 WMR cartridge and increase the barrel's bore diameter from the .22 LR's .222 inch to the new .22 Magnum's .224 inch. (The same bore diameter as centerfire .22 cartridges.) The Model 48 was otherwise identical to the Model 17.

The Model 48 K-22 MRF Masterpiece was introduced in May 1959 and, presto, S&W had a first rate .22 Magnum hunting revolver on the market. It was offered with a four, six, or 8-3/8 inch barrel, with six inches being the most popular length.

All S&W Masterpiece models were carbon steel target revolvers with a 1/8 inch wide Patridge type front sight on a raised and grooved, full length barrel rib and a micro adjustable (for windage and elevation) rear sight. They came with carefully fitted actions, a double latch cylinder, grooved target trigger, grooved front and back grip straps and checkered walnut Magna grips.

S&W initially cataloged a convertible M48 with an extra .22 LR cylinder. However, swapping cylinders on a double action revolver is not accomplished in seconds without using any tools, as it is with a single action Peacemaker type revolver, and the convertible option was quickly discontinued with very few produced.

The Model 48 Masterpiece was manufactured from 1959-1986. During that time there were five minor engineering changes and the revolvers are stamped accordingly on the frame inside of the cylinder crane (Model 48, 48-1, 48-2, 48-3 and 48-4).

Smith Wesson Model 48 Reviews

Our sample is a Model 48-4. The -4 was the last numbered engineering change and it moved the gas ring from the yoke to the cylinder. This change was introduced in 1977. The first years of M48-4 production were the last when S&W revolver barrels were both screwed and pinned in place. Our gun was made in 1980 and S&W dispensed with pinned barrels in 1982, as an unnecessary manufacturing expense.

Our test gun was acquired from a casual collector in the box, unfired, just as it was originally sold. He apparently bought the gun, put it on a shelf and never got back to it. It came with the paperwork, all accessories (cleaning rod, a small screwdriver, etc.) and still coated with factory preservative. It was quite a find!

Specifications

  • Type: DA revolver
  • Caliber: .22 Magnum
  • Cylinder capacity: 6 rounds
  • Barrel length: 6 in.
  • Sights: Fully adjustable, Patridge type
  • Sight radius: 7-9/32 in.
  • Metal finish: Bright bluing
  • Grips: Magna style checkered walnut
  • Wood finish: Lacquer
  • Overall length: 11-1/8 in.
  • Weight: 39 oz. (6 in. barrel)
  • Country of origin: USA
  • 1980 MSRP: $209
  • 2016 Fjestad's value: $895 (100% condition)

The first order of business, once our K-22 MRF Masterpiece was in hand, was to rid it of the long since gummed-up factory oil and grease. This was accomplished, as best we could without complete disassembly, by removing the two grip panels and thoroughly sluicing the action with Prolix (a potent cleaner, lubricant and protectant). After cleaning, the cylinder opened and turned freely, a considerable improvement.

Careful inspection confirmed that the frame is straight and the barrel is true to the frame. (Sadly, not always the case with S&Ws of this vintage.) The barrel has a gentle, straight taper from frame to muzzle. It measures 0.715 inch in diameter immediately in front of the frame and 0.593 inch at the muzzle. The muzzle is crowned to protect the bore, without undue tool marks.

Like all S&W double action revolvers, the cylinder rotates counter clockwise, or out of the frame. This is why they need double cylinder latches, one at the front of the ejector rod and the other at the rear of the cylinder.

When cocked, the bolt locks the cylinder firmly in place, without play. Indexing is precise and the barrel to cylinder gap is consistent and very tight. The chambers are recessed to fully enclose the cartridge case rims.

The hammer is powered by a long, flat mainspring inside the grip frame. There is a small tensioning screw located in the lower part of the front grip frame. Screwed all the way in at the factory, we loosened this screw about one full turn to make the hammer slightly easier to thumb cock.

Our RCBS trigger scale measured the single action (SA) trigger pull at five pounds with one 'tick' of creep and almost no over-travel. It actually feels lighter, but that is what it measured. Modern auto pistol shooters would think this trigger is wonderful, but as experienced revolver shooters, we know better.

The trigger pull of a fine target revolver should be about half that weight and completely smooth. Unfortunately, by the time this revolver was assembled (1980), internal action parts were no longer finished and fitted to the standards observed when the Wesson family owned the Company.

The DA pull was unmeasurable, since our scale only goes to eight pounds, but it is probably on the order of 13 or 14 pounds. The DA trigger pull is actually immaterial to a hunting revolver, as it is manually cocked before firing.

A firm push on the hand ejector rod lifts fired cases well clear of the cylinder. The firing pin impression on fired cases is uniform and positive, without being excessive. Functionally, everything works as it should.

All of the external metal surfaces of the barrel, cylinder and frame are highly polished and S&W bright blued, with the top of the frame and barrel rib matte finished to prevent glare. This is one of the best finishes in production handguns. However, with the cylinder swung open, one can see that the inside of the frame window only got a coarse polish; ditto the underside of the barrel normally hidden by the ejector rod when the cylinder is closed.

In traditional S&W fashion, the hammer and trigger are attractively color case hardened, rather than blued, for a bit of subtle contrast. The top of the hammer spur is aggressively machine checkered, with the tip of the diamonds left sharp. Flat topped diamonds would be less abrasive to the pad of the cocking thumb.

Model 48-4 revolvers came with S&W's Magna grips, one of the poorer attempts at revolver grip panels. They do not fill the space behind the trigger guard and they do not enclose the grip frame. The grip shape in cross-section is essentially a square with rounded corners, which is a poor match for the oval shape of a partially curled human hand. Fortunately, the .22 WMR cartridge does not kick hard enough to make the poorly shaped grips a problem. For a high volume shooter, a set of Pachmayr Presentation grips is the easy solution.

The Magna grips are adorned with very coarse, machine cut checkering surrounded by a border cut so deep it is better described as a trough. The gloss lacquer finish is attractive, but not very durable. The Magna grips only redeeming feature is that, being made of walnut, they look nice.

Since 1965, when the Wesson family sold the Company to Bangor Punta Alegre Sugar Corp., S&W has gone through several management and ownership changes and their manufacturing precision and quality control has been variable, to say the least. Unfortunately, not all S&W revolvers, even top of the line models, are created equal. Fortunately, our Model 48 appears to be one of the good ones.

The Model 48 was discontinued in 1986, by which time Smith & Wesson had definitely fallen on hard times. Product quality, and most of all quality control, had declined alarmingly, along with sales. Bangor Punta had essentially run the Company into the ground and in 1984 Bangor Punta and its subsidiaries, including Smith & Wesson, was acquired by Lear Siegler Corp., primarily an aerospace and automotive firm.

Two years later, at the end of 1986, Lear Siegler became the victim of a leveraged buyout led by Forstmann Little and Company and Smith & Wesson became the property of the new Lear Siegler Holdings Corporation, which quickly looked to divest itself of 'noncore' assets, including S&W.

Nevertheless, in 1989, the stainless steel Model 648 was introduced with a six inch, full under-lug barrel reminiscent of a Colt Diamondback. (A '6' prefix denotes stainless steel construction in S&W model numbers, so the Model 648 is a stainless steel Model 48.) This variation was produced until 1996.

In 1997, S&W was purchased by Tomkins PLC, a British owned conglomerate. In 2000, Tomkins signed the notorious agreement with the Clinton administration that made Smith & Wesson the pariah of the US firearms industry and sparked a consumer boycott of S&W products that endures to this day among shooters old enough to remember the betrayal. However, Tomkins did attempt to improve S&W's product quality, which by this time had been a festering problem for over a decade, by instituting improved production methods, improved product testing and better quality control.

In 2001, Saf-T-Hammer Corporation purchased Smith & Wesson from Tomkins. The following year, Saf-T-Hammer restyled itself as Smith & Wesson Holding Corp.

In 2003 the Model 648-2, a Model 648 version with an internal safety lock that was heartily disliked by shooters, was introduced. The 648-2's short production run ended in 2005.

The new Smith & Wesson Corporation has been racked by successive management scandals, turnover, controversy and patent infringement suits, while simultaneously attempting to license (some would say 'whore') the S&W name to products totally unrelated to firearms. However, they have also attempted to expand and improve the S&W firearms line.

Part of the latter effort was the introduction of the Classics line of, 'coveted models . . . enhanced with modern advantages.' The Model 48 Classic revolver was introduced in 2010. This is essentially a re-creation of the Model 48 K-22 MRF with a four or six inch barrel (sans under-lug). To our rather jaded eyes, the traditional Masterpiece guns, without the under-lug, are how a Smith & Wesson revolver should look and the Classic is in this mold. The Model 48 Classic remains in the line in 2016, as these words are written, so at least a clone of the original K-22 MRF Masterpiece lives on.

Note: An expanded version of this article, including shooting results, is available on the Product Reviews index page.

SAFETY HAMMERLESS

.32 Safety Hammerless (aka .32 New Departure or .32 Lemon Squeezer) 1st Model

Push button latch serial number 1- 91417. Built 1888-1902. NOTE: Add 50 percent premium for revolvers built before 1898.
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.32 Safety Hammerless 2nd Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
T-bar latch pinned front sight. Serial number 91418-169999. Built 1902 to 1909.
Wesson
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.32 Safety Hammerless 3rd Model

T-bar latch integral forged front sight. Serial number 170000-242981. Built 1909 to 1937. NOTE: Add 200 percent for 2' barrel Bicycle Model.
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.38 Double-Action 1st Model

Similar in appearance to .32 1st Model. Having a straight cut side-plate but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Grips are checkered. Serial Range 1-about 4000. Manufactured circa 1880.

Smith And Wesson Model 48 Serial Numbers 24

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.38 Double-Action 2nd Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
Similar in appearance to .32 2nd Model but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Approximately 115,000 manufactured between 1880 and 1884. Serial range about 4001-119000.
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.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

Essentially the same in appearance as .32 Model but chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Also offered with 3.25', 4', 5', 6', 8' and 10' barrel. There were numerous internal changes in this model, similar to .32 Double-Action 3rd Model. Serial Range 119001 to 3227000. Approximately 203,700 manufactured between 1884 and 1895.

.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
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.38 Double-Action 3rd Model

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.38 Double-Action 4th Model

This is .38 S&W version of 4th Model. Identical in outward appearance to 3rd Model. Relocation of sear was the main design change in this model. Serial Range 322701 to 539000. Approximately 216,300 manufactured between 1895 and 1909. NOTE: Add 20 percent premium for revolvers built before 1898.
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.38 Double-Action 5th Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
This model same as .32, except chambered for .38 S&W cartridge. Serial Range 529001 to 554077. Approximately 15,000 manufactured between 1909 and 1911.
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.38 Double-Action Perfected

A unique top-break, with both a barrel latch similar to other top-breaks and thumb-piece similar to hand ejectors. Also the only top-break where triggerguard is integral to the frame, rather than a separate piece. Produced from 1909 to 1920 in their own serial number range 1-59400.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 1st Model

Z-bar latch. Serial number range 1 to 5250. Made 1887 only. NOTE: Add 50 percent for 6' barrel. RARE!
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.38 Safety Hammerless 2nd Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
Push button latch protrudes above frame. Serial number 5251-42483. Built 1887-1890.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 3rd Model

Push button latch flush with frame. Serial number 42484-116002. Built 1890-1898.
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.38 Safety Hammerless Army Test Revolver

Approximately 100 sold to U.S. government in 1890. They have 3rd Model features, but in 2nd Model serial number range 41333-41470. Fitted with 6' barrels and marked 'US'. CAUTION: Be wary of fakes. NOTE: Rarity makes valuation speculative.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 4th Model

Wesson
Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
Produced in .38 S&W only. The only difference in 4th Model and 3rd Model is adoption of standard T-bar type of barrel latch as found on most of the top-break revolvers. '.38 S&W Cartridge' was also added to the left side of barrel. Approximately 104,000 manufactured between 1898 and 1907. Serial number range 116003 to 220000.
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.38 Safety Hammerless 5th Model

Courtesy Mike Stuckslager
Last of the 'Lemon Squeezers'. Only appreciable difference between this model and 4th Model is the front sight blade on 5th Model is an integral part of the barrel, not a separate blade pinned onto the barrel. Approximately 41,500 manufactured between 1907 and 1940. Serial number range 220001 to 261493. NOTE: Add 50 percent for 2' barrel version.
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First Model American

This model represented a number of firsts for Smith & Wesson Company. It was first of the top-break automatic ejection revolvers. Also first Smith & Wesson in a large caliber (chambered for .44 S&W American cartridge as well as .44 Henry rimfire on rare occasions). Also known as 1st Model American. This large revolver offered with an 8' round barrel with a raised rib as standard. Barrel lengths of 6' and 7' were also available. It has a 6-shot fluted cylinder and square butt with walnut grips. Blued or nickel-plated. Interesting to note, this model appeared three years before Colt's Single-Action Army and perhaps, more than any other model, was associated with the historic American West. Only 8,000 manufactured between 1870 and 1872. NOTE: Add 25 percent for 'oil hole' variation found on approximately first 1,500 guns; 50 percent for unusual barrel lengths other than standard 8'. Original 'Nashville Police' marked guns worth a substantial premium. About 200 made in .44 Henry rimfire will bring 25% to 50% premium.
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Model 3 American 1st Model

NOTE: Add 25 percent for 'oil hole' variation found on approximately first 1,500 guns; 50 percent for unusual barrel lengths other than standard 8'. Original 'Nashville Police' marked guns worth a substantial premium.
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Transitional American Model

Serial number range 6466-6744. Shorter cylinder (1.423'). Improved barrel of 2nd Model but retains the flat bottom frame of the 1st Model.
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First Model American U.S. Army Order

One thousand produced with 'U.S.' stamped on top of barrel. 'OWA' on left grip. They are scattered in the serial number range 125-2199.
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Model 3 American 1st Model

Only 200 produced throughout serial range. NOTE: Rarity makes valuation speculative.
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Second Model American

Courtesy Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, Wyoming
An improved version of 1st Model. Most notable difference is larger diameter trigger pivot pin and frame protrusions above trigger to accommodate it. Front sight blade on this model is made of steel instead of nickel silver. Several internal improvements were also incorporated into this model. This model commonly known as American 2nd Model. The 8' barrel length was standard. Approximately 20,735 manufactured between 1872 and 1874. NOTE: There have been 5.5', 6', 6.5' and 7' barrels noted; but they are extremely scarce and would bring a 40 percent premium over standard 8' model. Use caution when purchasing these short barrel revolvers. Approximately 3,014 chambered for .44 Henry rimfire with large triangular flat-tip firing pin, may bring 10% to 25% premium.
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Model 3 American 2nd Model

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Model 3 American 2nd Model

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First Model Russian (Old Model)

Configuration is about identical to American 2nd Model. S&W made several internal changes to this model to satisfy the Russian government. Markings on this revolver are distinct. Caliber for which it is chambered, .44 S&W Russian, is different from the 2nd Model Russian. Approximately 20,000 Russian-Contract revolvers. Serial number range 1-20000. They are marked in Russian Cyrillic letters. Russian double-headed eagle stamped on rear portion of barrel, with inspector's marks underneath it. All contract guns have 8' barrels and lanyard swivels on the butt. These are rarely encountered, as most were shipped to Russia. Commercial run of this model numbered approximately 4,655. Barrels are stamped in English and include the words 'Russian Model'. Some are found with 6' and 7' barrels, as well as standard 8'. There were also 500 revolvers that were rejected from the Russian contract series and sold on the commercial market. Some of these are marked in English; some, Cyrillic. Some have the Cyrillic markings ground off and English restamped. Manufactured from 1871 to 1874. Guns with Cyrillic barrel markings may bring up to 25% premium.
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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Model 3 Russian 1st Model

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Second Model Russian (Old Model)

Courtesy Jim Supica, Old Town Station
This revolver was known as 'Old Model Russian'. This is a complicated model to understand as there are many variations within the model designation. Serial numbering is quite complex as well and values vary due to relatively minor model differences. Before purchasing this model, it would be advisable to read reference materials solely devoted to this firearm. Chambered for .44 S&W Russian, with some scarce variations in .44 Henry rimfire cartridge. It has a 7' barrel and a round butt featuring a projection on the frame that fits into the thumb web. Grips are walnut and finish blue or nickel-plated. Triggerguard has a reverse curved spur on the bottom. Approximately 85,200 manufactured between 1873 and 1878. Variations include:Russian Contract Cyrillic marked – 10% premium, Japanese Navy, anchor with 2 wavy lines marked – 10% premium, .44 Henry Rimfire variations. Flat tipped triangular firing pin, Commercial - 500 made – 25% premium, 1st Turkish Contract, s/n range 1-1000 – 25-50% premium, 2nd Turkish Contract in standard s/n range – 25% premium
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

6,200 made, .44 S&W Russian, English markings.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

500 made.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

70,000 made; rare, as most were shipped to Russia. Cyrillic markings; lanyard swivel on butt.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

.44 rimfire Henry, special rimfire frames, serial-numbered in own serial number range 1-1000.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

Made from altered centerfire frames from regular commercial serial number range. 1,000 made. Use caution with this model.
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Model 3 Russian 2nd Model

Smith And Wesson Model 48 Serial Numbers

Five thousand made between 1-9000 serial number range. Japanese naval insignia, an anchor over two wavy lines, found on butt. Barrel is Japanese proofed and words 'Jan.19, 75 REISSUE July 25, 1871' are stamped on barrel, as well.
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Third Model Russian (New Model)

Model 3 Russian 3rd ModelThis revolver is also known as 'New Model Russian'. Factory referred to this model as Model of 1874 or Cavalry Model. Chambered for .44 S&W Russian and .44 Henry rimfire cartridge. Barrel is 6.5' and round butt is the same humped-back affair as 2nd Model. Grips are walnut and finish blue or nickel plated. Most notable differences in appearance between this model and 2nd Model are shorter extractor housing under the barrel and integral front sight blade instead of pinned-on one found on previous models. In addition to S&W production for the commercial market and Russian military, the German firm of Ludwig and Lowe and the Russian Tula arsenal made copies of this gun for the Russian military. These and other variations impact values. Refer to Standard Catalog of Smith & Wesson available at GunDigestStore.com for details. Approximately 60,638 manufactured between 1874 and 1878. Variations include: Japanese Navy, anchor with 2 wavy lines marked – 10% premium; .44 Henry Rimfire. Turkish contract or commercial – 25% premium; Russian Contract Cyrillic marked - Made by S&W – 10% premium; Made by Ludwig & Loewe – 10% premium; Made by Tula Russian arsenal – 20% premium
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

.44 S&W Russian. Marked 'Russian Model' in English. Made 13,500.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

5,000 made from altered centerfire frames. Made to fire .44 Henry rimfire. 'W' inspector's mark on butt. Fakes have been noted; be aware.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

1,000 made. Has Japanese naval insignia, an anchor over two wavy lines, stamped on butt.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model

Barrel markings are in Russian Cyrillic. Approximately 41,100 produced.
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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

German firm of Ludwig Loewe produced a copy of this model that is nearly identical to the S&W. This German revolver was made under Russian contract, as well as for commercial sales. Contract model has different Cyrillic markings than S&W and letters 'HK' as inspector's marks. Commercial model has markings in English. Russian arsenal at Tula also produced a copy of this revolver with a different Cyrillic dated stamping on barrel.

Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

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Model 3 Russian 3rd Model (Loewe & Tula Copies)

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Model 3 Schofield 1st Model

3,000 issued.
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Model 3 Schofield 1st Model

No 'US' markings, 35 made, Very Rare. NOTE: Use caution. UNABLE TO PRICE. At least double the military model values. Expert appraisal needed.

Second Model Schofield

Similar to the 1st Model Schofield with most noticeable differences being circles on each side of the frame-mounted latch, and serial number range. The vast majority were military issue, and are 'US' marked on butt. See comments on modified surplus guns and Wells Fargo Schofields at the listing for First Model Schofields above. In total, 646 Civilian Models were made, but despite their relative rarity they bring about the same value as the more common U.S.-issue Schofields. Serial range 3036-8969. Circa 1876-1877.
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Model 3 Schofield 2nd Model

Model
4,000 issued.
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Smith And Wesson 48 7

Model 3 Schofield 2nd Model

646 made.
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Schofield Surplus Models and Variations

Distributor modifications — After military use, many Schofields were sold as surplus and modified by distributers, who sometimes refinished the guns and shortened the barrel to 5”. These modified guns will bring less than guns in original configuration, perhaps 50% of what an original unaltered Schofield will bring.Wells Fargo — The famous Wells Fargo Express Company purchased a number of these shortened 5” barrel surplus Schofields and marked them on the ejector housing “W F & CO (or CO’S) EXP” along with the gun’s serial number. These “Wells Fargo Schofields” will bring close to the value of an original unaltered US Schofield. Beware of fake markings.San Francisco Police — Some Schofields are found with large 2- or 3-digit numbers stamped near the top of the backstrap. These have traditionally been “San Francisco Police” models, sent to California at the time of the Sandlot Riots. They will bring a slight premium.Civilian Models — See comments at 1st and 2nd Model Schofield listings above.
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Model 3 Schofield—Surplus Models

Smith And Wesson Model 27 2

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Model 3 Schofield—Surplus Models

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